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School Board Member 'Disappointed' With Trenton High School Test Results

Trenton High School students scored above state average on the Michigan Merit Exam (MME) in all subjects except math and science. Trenton students scored four points lower than state averages in both subjects.

Trenton Board of Education member Wayne Sieloff said he was "disappointed" after learning that Trenton 11th graders scored below the state average in math and science on the Michigan Merit Exam.

Sieloff learned of the test results at Monday's board of education meeting.

Trenton High School . Trenton students scored four points lower than state averages in both subjects.

"I believe that the board has provided ... resources, even in these trying times, in order to improve this or give the administration and the teachers the tools to do that, and i realize it's going to take some time to do that," Sieloff said. "But, maybe our analysis of our strategies for preparing students for a successful tomorrow isn't working..."

Trenton Director of Curriculum Ann Deneroff and High School Principal Michael Doyle presented the test results to district administrators and school board members at the meeting.

Deneroff stated Trenton juniors performed only slightly better than the state average in reading, writing and social studies, as shown in the chart below.


Reading Writing Math Science Social Studies Trenton 60 50 25 22 43 Michigan 56 49 29 26 41

Sieloff said he was also disappointed in test results of sophomores who took the PLAN test, which is a preliminary ACT test.

The results showed that only 63 percent of students we able to answer a certain sample test question provided in the report. Sieloff believed more students should have been able to answer the question.

Doyle said the majority of student learning happens in the classroom and administrators would have to take a look at classroom instruction to find a reason for the lower test results.

"In education, the rubber hits the pavement in the classroom," Doyle said.

Doyle said he and fellow administrators would create instructional strategies for next year's tests and bring them to the next board of education meeting on Aug. 27.

michelle July 24, 2012 at 05:17 PM
I'm disappointed too. My son is always on the honor role and yet when he took the standardized tests for the 6th graders he didn't do so well. So he is missing something. If they taught what the kids needed to know and they do well in the class shouldn't that translate to the standardized tests? I know he isn't learning all he could be since he tells me flat out that his classes are not challenging, he never has home work and I hardly see any projects to work on. The hardest class he had was forensic science and he loved it. I think Trenton needs to step things up. If not, we will continue to lose children in the district. A few years ago parents from outside would have done anything to get their kids in. Now we have school of choice and no rush of kids in. So...it is scary. I want my son to get into a great college one day (not so far off) and if Trenton cannot provide the education he needs to get there than I will be forced to look to other districts myself. PLEASE make the necessary changes and make Trenton what it used to be!
sine-of-the-times July 25, 2012 at 03:06 AM
Do we really want teachers teaching to the test? My daughter did math in the 6th grade that I used for lesson plans with my 9th graders in another district, seemed pretty much right on considering the benchmarks and tests and cut scores keep changing.
sine-of-the-times July 25, 2012 at 03:08 AM
Time to look at trimester time in math?
michelle July 25, 2012 at 01:17 PM
I understand what you are saying but tests like the ACT and SATs are what helps the kids get into College. I also earned a MI scholarship for college from taking a standardized test my sophmore year. So as much as we may not agree with them, they are important and may help or hinder the road to college. Personally, I do think there is a lot more to a child than what a standardized test can reflect. We are not sitting there taking these tests at our jobs (at least most jobs).
Christine C. July 25, 2012 at 01:24 PM
I am disappointed as well. Perhaps it has something to do with the limitations placed on students. As an example, my soon to be 7th grader took the advances placement math test for this coming year and qualified with 12 others out of 80 that took the test. The letter home states "you qualified BUT sorry, we don't have room for you and you are on a waiting list" they took only 4 students for the class so far. So now, next year when he could be learning ahead, where will he be? Maybe it's time to revamp the whole system. Learning cannot only be done at school. Parents need to step up and take a vested interest in their childs future. Let's start catering to those that can pull ahead, perhaps sone classes with self paced learning. Encourage kids to look beyond. I completely agree with michelle. As a 6th grader my son has been bored and unchallenged, no homework, no projects. I have been forced to consider alternatives. Even considering home school although I have a full time job as well so how can I not expect him to be taught at school.
Sonya Smith July 25, 2012 at 11:41 PM
I agree Christine. There is nothing to encourage students to excel. We don't even have Science Fair anymore.

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