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New Report Reveals Total Compensation for Trenton, Grosse Ile Superintendents

Total compensation for a superintendent in Michigan public schools includes salary, benefits, travel expenses, pension and annuity.

The Macinaw Center for Public Policy released a report Wednesday that allows people to access detailed compensation information for superintendents in Michigan school districts.

The online, searchable database lists total compensation information for 606 superintendents including salaries, insurance packages, travel expenses, pensions and annuities. The database also includes a link to individual superintendent contracts.

Each district's superintendent is ranked from 1 to 606 for highest to lowest total compensation.

Trenton and Grosse Ile superintendents, Rod Wakeham and William Eis, are ranked in the top 160 of highest compensated superintendents in Michigan, but are not the highest compensated Downriver, according to the database.

Wakeham receives $174,778 in annual total compensation and Eis receives total compensation of $173,140. Trenton Public Schools and Grosse Ile Township Schools are ranked near the middle of all Downriver schools.

The highest compensated superintendent at a Downriver school district is Carl Weiss at Romulus Community Schools, a district of about 3,684 students, with a total annual compensation of $208,253. Weiss receives $157,399 in annual salary, $17,434 for insurance, $33,420 in pension and $0 in annuity and travel expenses.

Enrollment at Romulus Community Schools is considerably higher than that of Trenton Public Schools and Grosse Ile Township Schools. Trenton's enrollment is 2,751 students, while Grosse Ile's enrollment is 1,847 students.

Dearborn Public Schools has the third highest enrollment of any school in Wayne County, behind the Detroit City School District and Plymouth-Canton Community Schools, with 18,840 students. Dearborn's Superintendent Brian Whiston receives total compensation of $218,355.

While Wakeham and Eis are near the top of the total list of Michigan's highest compensated superintendents, their salaries are very close to the average superintendent's salary in the state. Wakeham's annual salary is $129,000 and Eis' annual salary is $134,000.

The average annual salary for Michigan superintendents is $115,000.

*These numbers represent the worth of each superintendent's total compensation package. Superintendents earn an average salary of $115,000 in Michigan.

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Jennifer Blackledge Moberly February 22, 2013 at 05:05 PM
Most people's salaries would sound a lot better if you expressed it in TOTAL compensation. Pension, sick days, health coverage add up. Ask instead why the Mackinac Center for Public Policy released this report and why they want you to be outraged. They are (and always have been) enemies of public education. You can bet that if they turned all the public schools over to charter school companies their administrators and CEOs would be paid a good deal more (as they are already).
Nate Stemen (Editor) February 22, 2013 at 06:45 PM
@Jennifer Blackledge Moberly: The term total compensation is used repeatedly in this article. There's also a reminder at the bottom of the article. "The online, searchable database lists total compensation information for 606 superintendents including salaries, insurance packages, travel expenses, pensions and annuities. The database also includes a link to individual superintendent contracts." *These numbers represent the worth of each superintendent's total compensation package. Superintendents earn an average salary of $115,000 in Michigan.
cscharlt February 23, 2013 at 10:53 PM
Jennifer - unless you're trying to make a point, maybe you oughta take a second and re-read the article...
Jennifer Blackledge Moberly February 24, 2013 at 12:48 AM
Cscharit, I was trying to make a point. Sorry if I wasn't clear. My issue was not with the term "total compensation" being defined. I wanted to point out the source of the information (Mackinac Center for Public Policy) and ask people to think about their motives. Superintendents' salaries have always been publicly available information, so what is the purpose of broadcasting it now? Superintendents have spoken out against the EAA recently, and the MCPP has been pushing privatization of public education for many years. Is this their way of turning public opinion against superintendents now? Teachers and schools have already been dragged through the mud...it seems as if it's the superintendents' turn. That was my point -- to consider the source, the motive, and the way it was presented (salary is the most common way to discuss pay, rather than total compensation).

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